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FAQ

 

Q: What is compounding?

Compounding combines an ageless art with the latest medical knowledge and state-of-the-art technology, allowing specially trained professionals to prepare customized medications to meet each patient’s specific needs. Compounding is fundamental to the profession of pharmacy and was a standard means of providing prescription medications before drugs began to be produced in mass quantities by pharmaceutical manufacturers. The demand for professional compounding has increased as healthcare professionals and patients realize that the limited number of strengths and dosage forms that are commercially available do not meet the needs of many patients, and that these patients often have a better response to a customized dosage form that is “just what the doctor ordered”.

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Q: Who can take compounded medication?

Both Humans and Animals can take compounded medication. Remember, compounding is how pharmacy was done a hundred years ago, using today’s high tech environment. Children, adults and the elderly benefit most from compounding. The taste of the medication can be customized to allow for a child’s fickle pallet. Pills can be compounded into creams so elderly patients can more easily receive medications. Your pet can have their medication customized according to their weight and tasting preferences. Compounding allows you to receive the medication in the most convenient way possible without compromising optimal effectiveness.

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Q: What prescriptions can be compounded?

All kinds of prescriptions can be compounded. Both the form (i.e. solutions, suppositories, sprays, oral rinses, lollipops, creams and lotions) and strength of the medication can be customized. Compounding applications can include: Bio-identical Hormone Replacement Therapy, Veterinary, Hospice, Pediatric, Ophthalmic, Dental, Otic (for the ear), Dermatology, Chronic Pain Management, Neuropathies, Sports Medicine, Infertility, Wound Therapy, Podiatry and Gastroenterology. Health Dimensions can compound:

  • unique dosage forms containing the best dose of medication for each individual.
  • medications in dosage forms that are not commercially available, such as transdermal gels, troches, “chewies”, and lollipops.
  • medications free of problem-causing excipients such as dyes, sugar, lactose, gluten or alcohol.
  • combinations of various compatible medications into a single dosage form for easier administration and improved compliance.
  • medications that are not commercially available.

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Q: Will my insurance cover compounded medications?

Insurance may cover your medications that are compounded. What we do is provide you with an insurance reimbursement form that can be mailed or faxed to your insurance company. However, to get your medications you will need to pay up front for your prescription. We take all major credit cards, checks and cash for payment. Further, we keep our costs as low as possible to minimize your out-of-pocket cost.

Because compounded medications are exempt by law from having the National Drug Code ID numbers that manufactured products carry, some insurance companies will not directly reimburse the compounding pharmacy. However, almost every insurance plan allows for the patient to be reimbursed by sending in claims forms. So even though you pay us on the front end of your prescription, you will most likely be reimbursed by your insurance company after you submit your claim.

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Q: Is compounding expensive?

Compounding may or may not cost more than conventional medication. Its cost depends on the type of dosage form and equipment required, plus the time spent researching and preparing the medication. Fortunately, compounding pharmacists have access to pure-grade quality chemicals which dramatically lower overall costs and allow them to be very competitive with commercially manufactured products.

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Q: Is compounding legal, and is it safe?

Compounding has been part of healthcare since the origins of pharmacy, and is widely used today in all areas of the industry, from hospitals to nuclear medicine. Over the last decade, the resurgence of coumpounding has largely benefited from advances in technology, quality control and research methodology. The Food and Drug Administration has stated that compounded prescriptions are both ethical and legal as long as they are prescribed by a licensed practitioner for a specific patient and compounded by a licensed pharmacy. In addition, compounding is regulated by state boards of pharmacy.

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Q: Does my doctor know about compounding?

Prescription compounding is a rapidly growing component of many physicians’ practices. But in today’s world of aggressive marketing by drug manufacturers, some may not realize the extent of compounding’s resurgence in recent years. Ask your physician about compounding. Then get in touch with a compounding pharmacy – one that is committed to providing high-quality compounded medications in the dosage form and strength prescribed by the physician.

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Q: Do I need a prescription for custom compounded drugs?

Yes, a prescription is required for all compounded medications. However, we carry nutritional supplements that do not require a prescription.

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Q: How can I receive my prescription from your pharmacy?

Most of our prescriptions are shipped directly to patients. We ship anywhere domestically by US mail or UPS. In addition, if you live locally, you have the option of coming to our pharmacy and picking up your prescription.

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Q: What is the natural Testosterone is made from?

Soy

 

Q: What are the Estrogens and Progesterone derived from?

Yam

 

Q: Are the yams and soy GMO (Genetically modified organisms)?

No

 

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